Custom Cricut Christmas Stocking [Free Cricut SVG file]

Ready to use some of your Cricut Iron-On Vinyl or Heat Transfer vinyl stash? This project is perfect whether you’re dipping your toes in for the first time or if you’re a seasoned pro at Cricut! Even if you don’t have a heat press or Cricut Easypress machine, you can still complete this easy project with an iron.

If you like this tutorial, join our Facebook community where I post my free SVG files and resources! I look forward to crafting with you!

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MATERIALS TO MAKE CUSTOM CHRISTMAS STOCKINGS

My free SVG design file (available in my free resource library – get the password by filling out the form on the sidebar or below).

Not subscribed? Get access to the free resource library below!

HOW TO MAKE CUSTOM CHRISTMAS STOCKINGS WITH A CRICUT

If you’d rather watch a video on the instructions, take a look at this video here (highly recommended!):

STEP 1: DOWNLOAD THE SVG FILE

Grab your SVG file from the free resource library.

Unzip the file. If you do not have a program installed on your computer to unzip, I recommend 7-zip. (It’s free! Windows only. Mac comes with an unzipper; just double-click on the zip file.)

STEP 2: DESIGN IN CRICUT DESIGN SPACE

Upload the paw print design in Cricut Design Space if you are using it.

The design is already sized for cutting. You only need to “weld” it and it’s ready to go.

To customize our stocking, select the text tool.

The font I am using on these stockings is called Lovina October Five. It is free for personal use or you can purchase a commercial licence here if you plan on selling physical stockings.

Type in your name and adjust the sizing so that it is no larger than 7″ in width. You may need to “ungroup” the letters and manually move them around to get your desired look.

With the font I am using, adjusting the letter-spacing to -0.6 worked perfectly.

After you are satisfied with your design, remember to WELD everything so it cuts as one name and not individual letters.

Now we are ready to cut it out.

STEP 3: CUT IT OUT

Cricut Design Space will sort the mats based on colour. Since we only have one colour, there should only be one mat.

Before you cut it out, be sure to turn MIRROR ON. We always mirror the design when we are working with Cricut Iron-On or other heat transfer vinyl.

Cut out your design.

STEP 4: WEED

Now we need to weed our iron-on vinyl. (This basically means removing the parts we don’t want to use.)

I like to start from the corner to get the bigger piece off and then use my weeding tools to get the smaller bits.

I also leave this on my mat to help hold down the design to make it easier to weed.

Tip // Place your protective cover sheet on the part of the mat below the design you are weeding. This protects the mat when you are weeding.

You may have seen people talk about transfer tape. Transfer tape is not necessary when using iron-on or heat transfer vinyl.

STEP 5: IRON ON THE STOCKING

Now that our Cricut Iron-on Vinyl is ready to go, we can start preparing our stocking for ironing.

I am using the Cricut Easy Press 2 (9×9) but this can be done with any other ironing device such as a regular iron or a heat press machine. Cricut makes it easy to find the correct temperature and timing to use with their products.

So how do we find the correct temperature to use for our Cricut Iron-on?

Head over to Cricut’s heat guide and put in the materials we are using. (This is a great page to bookmark!)

However, when I did a few test runs on my stocking, the red fabric underneath was bleeding into my vinyl. If this happens, the iron is TOO HOT.

The magic number for the stockings I was using was 250 degrees for 30s.

Keep checking your iron-on to make sure you didn’t burn it.

I cut the paw prints and arranged them on my stocking.

Then, make sure to use an extra protective sheet on top of your Cricut iron-on. Cricut sells rolls of iron-on protective sheets. Some great Cricut iron-on protective sheet alternatives are parchment paper or a sheet of Teflon.

Place a protective sheet (parchment paper) on top of the design.

Once you are ready to press, press the Cricut logo and it will start counting down.

What do I do? My Cricut iron-on is not sticking.

You can check if your vinyl adhered by lifting a small area and seeing if the vinyl is attached. If you find that the vinyl isn’t sticking, either do another run with the iron or turn up the temperature.

It is always better to start at a lower temperature and increase it gradually than just ramping up the temperature and risk the ink bleeding or burning your stocking.

Once you are satisfied that the iron-on vinyl has stuck to the stocking, let it COMPLETELY COOL. Do not pull off the sheet until it is completely cool. This is known as a cool peel.

CONGRATULATIONS

Great job! You just made a personalized Christmas Stocking using your Cricut. Be sure to let the vinyl sit on the stocking for 24 hours before washing it. You can also re-iron the design if you see some parts peeling.

Looking for ideas on stocking stuffers? Check out this list for kids or this list of over 90 ideas for the husband/boyfriend.

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